9TH ANNUAL RIDE TO CONQUER CANCER - AUGUST 26-27, 2017

ABOUT CANCER IN CANADA

INCIDENCE & MORTALITY

Cancer strikes males and females, young and old, and those in different regions across Canada on a decidedly uneven basis. This section examines incidence and mortality by sex, age and geographic region to see how cancer affects people in Canada.


Incidence & Mortality

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada and is responsible for over 30% of all deaths.

Four cancers—prostate, breast, lung and colorectal—together are expected to account for more than half (about 50%) of all new cases diagnosed in Canada in 2016.

Cancer primarily affects Canadians over the age of 50, as 89% of all new cases are diagnosed in people in this age group.

In 2016, it is estimated that 89% of all cancers will be diagnosed in Canadians age 50 years and over, while 44% will occur in Canadians 70 years of age and older.

Increases in the number of new cases are largely due to a growing and aging population.

This report is available at cancer.ca and ncic.cancer.ca



Chances of developing or dying from cancer

Every day, 555 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer and 216 will die. Every hour, an estimated 23 people will be diagnosed with cancer, and nine will die.

In 2016, an estimated 202,400 new cases of cancer and 78,800 cancer deaths will occur Canada.

An estimated 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes, and 1 in 4 will die from it.

This report is available at cancer.ca and ncic.cancer.ca



Prevalence

Prevalence is the total number of people living with a diagnosis of cancer at a certain point in time. This statistic can be useful in planning healthcare services for people recently diagnosed with cancer and for cancer survivors.

In 2009, about 810,045 Canadians diagnosed with cancer in the previous 10 years were alive. This represented about 2.4% of the Canadian population or 1 out of every 42 Canadians.

The number of newly diagnosed cancer cases in Canada is increasing, but survival rates are also increasing.

This report is available at cancer.ca and ncic.cancer.ca



Incidence by Region

Over the coming 15 years, projections produced by BC statistics suggest that the population of BC is expected to grow by 20% or about 1 million residents. The number of seniors in BC (those aged 65 or older) is expected to be 72% higher in 2027 compared with 2011, which amounts to an increase of about half a million seniors.

The increase in cases per year between 2011 and 2027 is expected to be more than 10,000. This increase is greater than the total number of cancers currently diagnosed annually in the Vancouver Coastal and Vancouver Island Health Authorities combined.

In 2016, an estimated 25,600 new cases will be diagnosed in British Columbia.

In British Columbia, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2016, an estimated 1,550 men and 1,550 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer.

For men in British Columbia, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2016, an estimated 3,300 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

For women in British Columbia, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2016, an estimated 3,500 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.

In 2016, an estimated 1,800 men and 1,400 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

For more information, go to Canadian Cancer Statistics publication.



Gender

Approximately 99,500 Canadian women and 102,900 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer in 2016.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death for both sexes. It is responsible for approximately equal proportions of all cancer deaths in both males and females.

Prostate cancer remains the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, with 21,600 new cases expected in 2016.

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer diagnosed in women, with 25,700 new cases expected in 2016.

For both Canadian men and women, the median age of cancer diagnosis is between 65 and 69 years of age.

For more information, go to Canadian Cancer Statistics Publication.

Source: Canadian Cancer Society